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Pharmaceutical Chemistry Journal

, Volume 1, Issue 11, pp 653–657 | Cite as

Use of polysiloxanes to prevent foaming during fermentation (literature review)

  • R. D. Soifer
  • P. S. Zasypkina
  • Ya. I. Mindlin
Technology
  • 37 Downloads

Conclusions

  1. 1.

    Polyorganosiloxanes containing hydroxyl groups are among the most effective and economical antifoams. A connection exists between the antifoam capability of polysiloxanes and the presence of polar functional groups in their molecules, the character of these groups, and their position in the polymer molecule.

     
  2. 2.

    Different organosilicon antifoams act differently in relation to the antibiotic cultured liquids which differ in their foaming properties. The specific character of the activity of the antifoams on the foams of certain cultured liquids was experimentally established.

     
  3. 3.

    The method of using antifoam polysiloxanes has an important significance along with the selection of the most suitable solvents, emulsifiers, choice of storage conditions, sterilization, and methods of introducing the antifoams into the ferment.

     

Keywords

Polymer Hydroxyl Organic Chemistry Storage Condition Specific Character 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Consultants Bureau 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. D. Soifer
    • 1
  • P. S. Zasypkina
    • 1
  • Ya. I. Mindlin
    • 1
  1. 1.All-Union Research Institute of AntibioticsMoscow

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