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Thermoregulatory and subjective responses of clothed men in the cold during continuous and intermittent exercise

Summary

Thermoregulatory and thermal subjective responses were studied in ten male, clothed subjects during continuous (C) and intermittent (I) exercise at the same average level of oxygen consumption. The subjects performed both I and C twice, dressed in two different three-layer cold-protective clothing ensembles of two thermal insulation levels [total clothing insulation = 2.59 clo (L) and 3.20 clo (H)]. Experiments were carried out at an ambient temperature of −10°C. Rectal temperatures increased similarly in both types of exercise. Mean skin temperature (T sk) was lower in 1 compared to C with both levels of clothing insulation. Over the last 0.5 h of the experimentT sk was approximately 1.3°C lower in 1 than in C for clothing L. The skin evaporation rate was higher in clothing H than L but did not differ between I and C. Subjective ratings for thermal sensations of the whole body (BTS) and hands were close to neutral in I and around slightly warm in C. The BTS was lower in I than in C and was lower in L compared to H. It was concluded that, at equal average energy expenditure, thermal responses to intermittent and continuous exercise in the Gold differ in clothed subjects, principally as a result of different patterns of heat exchange.

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Correspondence to Désirée C. E. Gavhed.

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Gavhed, D.C.E., Nielsen, R. & Holmér, I. Thermoregulatory and subjective responses of clothed men in the cold during continuous and intermittent exercise. Europ. J. Appl. Physiol. 63, 29–35 (1991). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00760797

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Key words

  • Clothing
  • Cold
  • Exercise
  • Thermal sensation
  • Thermoregulation