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Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

, Volume 7, Issue 2, pp 147–159 | Cite as

The consequences of acculturation to service delivery and research with Hispanic families

  • Patrick A. Curtis
Articles

Abstract

The experience of working with Hispanic children and their parents is compared with the existing professional literature. Although the literature acknowledges partially the importance of acculturation, the consequences of acculturation to service delivery and working with Hispanics as research subjects are seldom addressed. These consequences are demonstrated in four areas: as a cause of family problems, in the attitudes of Hispanics toward speaking Spanish and English, in the status of folk healers in the Hispanic community, and in attitudes toward the delivery of human services. The failure to take into account the consequences of acculturation can contribute to the further underutilization of mental health services by Hispanic families.

Keywords

Mental Health Health Service Social Psychology Mental Health Service Service Delivery 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patrick A. Curtis
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Children's Home and Aid Society of IllinoisChicago
  2. 2.Institute for Clinical Social Work, Inc.Chicago

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