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Clinical Social Work Journal

, Volume 19, Issue 4, pp 349–362 | Cite as

From delusion to play

  • Jon Frederickson
Articles

Abstract

Winnicott suggested that delusions are a failed form of play. Using Winnicott's theories of the play space, this paper illustrates through clinical material how the therapist can join a delusion and convert it into an area of play. Discussion includes an analysis of the use of play in working with the transference and countertransference as well as the therapist's resistances to engaging in play.

Keywords

Clinical Material Play Space Failed Form 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jon Frederickson
    • 1
  1. 1.Washington

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