Child and Youth Care Forum

, Volume 21, Issue 5, pp 347–359 | Cite as

Increasing the quality of family child care homes: Strategies for the 1990s

  • Nancy E. Cohen
Section II. Child Care Program Settings

Abstract

Comprehensive systems to improve the quality of family child care should include basic and intensive services, reach large numbers of regulated and unregulated providers, and improve the overall child care infrastructure. Currently, however, most quality-improvement projects offer only intensive services to limited numbers of regulated providers and include minimal infrastructure development.

Keywords

Social Psychology Child Care Care Home Infrastructure Development Comprehensive System 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nancy E. Cohen
    • 1
  1. 1.Families and Work InstituteNew York

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