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Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

, Volume 6, Issue 1, pp 72–95 | Cite as

Group therapy for preschool children: A transdisciplinary school-based program

  • Rebecca Shahmoon Shanok
  • Steven J. Welton
  • Carole Lapidus
Articles

Abstract

Children under six and-a-half years are being seen in group therapy in on-site sessions at day care centers and nursery schools in New York. A general description of this program and the wide range of children it serves is provided, along with a brief discussion of the foundations upon which the modality is based. The transdisciplinary nature of the program is elaborated, with some highlighting of the contributions from the theory and practice of social work.

The course of treatment for two disadvantaged children from very different settings is detailed, with treatment vignettes which put in relief the uses that these individual children make of the group process. Finally, a discussion of the enabling agents of Therapeutic Nursery Group interventions is offered, emphasizing the rationale for technical aspects of work in groups with preschool children.

Keywords

Group Intervention Social Psychology Social Work Care Center Preschool Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rebecca Shahmoon Shanok
    • 1
  • Steven J. Welton
  • Carole Lapidus
  1. 1.Child Development CenterJBFCSNew York

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