Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

, Volume 6, Issue 1, pp 18–37 | Cite as

Ghosts in the nursery revisited

  • Vivian B. Shapiro
  • Martha Gisynski
Articles
  • 189 Downloads

Abstract

In the last decades new research findings have illuminated many of the factors that affect the mental health development of the pre-verbal child. Attachment theory has emerged as a central concept which has great applicability to the clinical field of infant-mental health. The new knowledge base has been utilized by clinical research programs to develop new models of clinical intervention programs with infants-at-risk and their families. This article describes some of the theoretical and research findings which can be translated to, and enhance, traditional child welfare practice. The theoretical considerations are illustrated by case examples.

Keywords

Mental Health Knowledge Base Social Psychology Clinical Research Intervention Program 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vivian B. Shapiro
    • 1
  • Martha Gisynski
    • 2
  1. 1.Community Medicine at the Mount Sinai Medical SchoolNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.University of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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