Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

, Volume 6, Issue 4, pp 313–326 | Cite as

Respite and family support services: Responding to the need

  • Jackie Starkey
  • Pasquale Sarli
Articles

Abstract

Increased focus on the needs of parents and guardians for structured opportunities for temporary relief from care of disabled persons has stimulated policy and implementation initiatives at the state government level on behalf of these families. This article presents qualitative and quantitative data on the need for respite services not only in terms of relief, but as a positive, supportive force in the prevention of permanent placement outside the home. Current services are outlined and issues important to clinicians and managers working with such families are discussed.

Keywords

Social Psychology Quantitative Data State Government Family Support Support Service 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jackie Starkey
    • 1
    • 2
  • Pasquale Sarli
  1. 1.Bx.
  2. 2.Family Support Services in N.Y.S. Office of Mental Retardation and Developmental DisabilitiesUSA

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