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Clinical Social Work Journal

, Volume 21, Issue 2, pp 195–212 | Cite as

Dual relationships: Client perceptions of the effect of client-counselor relationship on the therapeutic process

  • Penny Smith Ramsdell
  • Earle R. Ramsdell
Articles

Abstract

Sixty-seven former clients of a large metropolitan counseling center were surveyed as to the frequency with which they experienced 21 specific forms of client-counselor contact during therapy. Thirteen behaviors surveyed described forms of social contact and eight behaviors described forms of physical contact. Respondents also evaluated the 21 behaviors as to their presumed effect on the therapy by rating each behavior on a scale ranging from −2, “very detrimental,” to +2, “very beneficial.” Four client-counselor behaviors were rated by a majority of respondents as beneficial to therapy, and eight client-counselor behaviors were rated by a majority of respondents as detrimental to therapy.

Keywords

Specific Form Physical Contact Social Contact Therapeutic Process Counseling Center 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Penny Smith Ramsdell
    • 1
  • Earle R. Ramsdell
    • 2
  1. 1.Pastoral Counselling and Educational CenterDallas
  2. 2.School of Social WorkUniversity of Texas at ArlingtonArlington

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