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Community Mental Health Journal

, Volume 17, Issue 2, pp 107–113 | Cite as

Factors which contribute to normalization in residential facilities for the mentally ill

  • John T. Hull
  • Joy C. Thompson
Articles

Abstract

There is a growing body of evidence which suggests that normalization is significantly related to improved adaptive functioning among disabled persons. If this is so, then the concept of normalization should be taken into account in program planning. The present study suggests that characteristics of clients such as age and adaptive functioning level contribute to the achievement of high levels of environmental normalization in residential settings, but that characteristics of the residence, particularly its size, and the number of types of disability groups residing in the home, as well as the nature of the community in which the residence is located are even more important than individual characteristics. Some tentative conclusions for planning residential facilities are advanced.

Keywords

Public Health Health Psychology Individual Characteristic Functioning Level Program Planning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • John T. Hull
    • 1
  • Joy C. Thompson
    • 2
  1. 1.the Children's Services DivisionMinistry of Community and Social ServicesTorontoCanada
  2. 2.the Department of EducationWinnipeg

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