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Community Mental Health Journal

, Volume 28, Issue 2, pp 141–150 | Cite as

Adaptation: The key to community psychiatric practice in the rural setting

  • Deborah A. Reed
Community Psychiatric Practice

Abstract

Psychiatric practice in the rural community mental health center can be arduous and challenging. Faced with limited resources, the full-time psychiatrist practicing in this setting must learn to be innovative and creative in order to adequately address the needs of this special population. Additionally, the social problems of poverty, domestic violence, and the lack of formal education impact on psychiatric treatment in rural centers to a very large degree. Clinicians must carefully consider ways in which they can interface with existing institutions and other community caregivers in providing mental health services. This paper discusses one clinician's experience in providing psychiatric services to patients in rural Kentucky.

Keywords

Mental Health Health Center Mental Health Service Domestic Violence Rural Community 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Deborah A. Reed
    • 1
  1. 1.Comprehensive Care Centers of Northern KentuckyWilliamstown

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