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Community Mental Health Journal

, Volume 27, Issue 2, pp 95–103 | Cite as

The National Alliance for the Mentally Ill: A decade later

  • Agnes B. Hatfield
Editorial Comment

Abstract

The National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI) was conceived a decade ago in the tradition of self-organized parents' groups for handicapped and chronically ill children. The character of the organization and its rapid growth are thought to be due to its clear identity as a “mental illness” group, its control and direction by parents and relatives of people suffering from mental illness, and its relationships with staff and professionals. The author believes that the NAMI movement is at an important juncture in its development and identifies factors that could influence its character in the next decade.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Agnes B. Hatfield
    • 1
  1. 1.the University of MarylandGreenbelt

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