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Cytotechnology

, Volume 17, Issue 1, pp 1–11 | Cite as

Apoptosis in CHO cell batch cultures: examination by flow cytometry

  • Alison Moore
  • Christopher J. Donahue
  • Jeff Hooley
  • Diana L. Stocks
  • Kenneth D. Bauer
  • Jennie P. Mather
Article

Abstract

Chinese hamster ovary cells grown under conditions which are optimal for the production of a genetically engineered protein in batch culture, lose significant viability shortly after entering the stationary phase. This cell death was investigated morphologically and was found to be almost exclusively via apoptosi. Furthermore, cells were analyzed by flow cytometry using a fluorescent DNA end-labeling assay to label apoptotic cells, in conjunction with cell cycle analysis using propidium iodide. Apoptotic cells could be detected by this method, and by the radioactive end-labeling of extracted DNA, on all days of culture from day 1 to day 7; however, the degree of apoptotic cell death increased dramatically when the cells entered the stationary phase, rising to 50–60% of the total cell number at the termination of the culture. Flow cytometric analysis showed that the majority of cells underwent apoptosis whilst in G1/G0 and formed an apoptotic population with high DNA FITC end-labeling and hypodiploid propidium iodide binding. Additionally, the ability or inability to secrete specific protein products did not appear to interfere with the development of the apoptotic population with time.

Key words

Apoptosis programmed cell death CHO cells batch culture 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alison Moore
    • 1
  • Christopher J. Donahue
    • 2
  • Jeff Hooley
    • 2
  • Diana L. Stocks
    • 1
  • Kenneth D. Bauer
    • 2
  • Jennie P. Mather
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Cell BiologyGenentech. Inc.South San FranciscoUSA
  2. 2.Department of ImmunologyGenentech. Inc.South San FranciscoUSA

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