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Relativistic Doppler effect in light clocks construed as a result of prior acceleration

Abstract

During a transverse acceleration of a light clock from rest, the mirrors must be tilted so as to retain the light pulse. The mirrors therefore have a normal velocity which increases the frequency of the pulse at each reflection. If a mirror is annihilated, the frequency of the escaping pulse, as a result of many reflections, is that of the relativistic Doppler effect. This holds for any acceleration, if the Fitzgerald contraction is assumed, thereby furnishing a new mechanism for such frequencies. The traditional mechanism, in which the source (subject to the time dilation) generates a pulse modulated by the source motion, is therefore not a unique explanation of the Doppler effect. The new mechanism permits the speculation that radiation preexists in atomic sources, rather than being generated at the instant of release.

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Reference

  1. S. J. Prokhovnik,Found. Phys. 10, 197 (1980).

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Kelly, E.M. Relativistic Doppler effect in light clocks construed as a result of prior acceleration. Found Phys 14, 705–720 (1984). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00736617

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00736617

Keywords

  • Radiation
  • Reflection
  • Light Pulse
  • Doppler Effect
  • Normal Velocity