Autonomous Robots

, Volume 2, Issue 1, pp 77–88 | Cite as

Design and testing of a low-cost robotic wheelchair prototype

  • David P. Miller
  • Marc G. Slack
Article

Abstract

Many people who are mobility impaired are, for a variety of reasons, incapable of using an ordinary wheelchair. In some instances, a power wheelchair also cannot be used, usually because of the difficulty the person has in controlling it (often due to additional disabilities). This paper describes two low-cost robotic wheelchair prototypes that assist the operator of the chair in avoiding obstacles, going to pre-designated places, and maneuvering through doorways and other narrow or crowded areas. These systems can be interfaced to a variety of input devices, and can give the operator as much or as little moment by moment control of the chair as they wish. This paper describes both systems, the evolution from one system to another, and the lessons learned.

Keywords

assistive robotics behavior control navigation low-cost robots 

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References

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • David P. Miller
    • 1
  • Marc G. Slack
    • 2
  1. 1.MITRE CorporationMcLeanUSA
  2. 2.MITRE CorporationMcLeanUSA

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