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Effect of low temperature and medium on the kinetics of fatigue failure of 3M titanium alloy

  • E. I. Aleksenko
  • N. M. Grinberg
  • S. I. Aksenova
  • N. A. Grekov
  • G. I. Arkavenko
Article
  • 27 Downloads

Conclusions

  1. 1.

    A reduction of the air pressure reduces the rate of fatigue crack growth and increases the threshold range of the SIF in 3M titanium alloy.

     
  2. 2.

    A reduction of temperature in vacuum is accompanied by a nonmonotonic variation of the cracking resistance characteristics of the 3M alloy. At 93 K the rate of fatigue crack growth decreases and the threshold range increases. However, a further reduction of temperature to 11 K results in the reversed effect, with the rate of fatigue crack propagation becomming comparable with that in air.

     
  3. 3.

    A variation in the duration of the crack initiation stage with a reduction of the air pressure and temperature correlates with the variation of the threshold SIF.

     
  4. 4.

    On the basis of changes in the microstructure of the fracture surfaces, it can be concluded that the energy capacity of fatigue failure increases with a reduction of the air pressure and decreases with a reduction of temperature to 11 K.

     

Keywords

Fatigue Fatigue Crack Titanium Alloy Crack Initiation Fatigue Crack Growth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. I. Aleksenko
    • 1
  • N. M. Grinberg
    • 1
  • S. I. Aksenova
    • 1
  • N. A. Grekov
    • 1
  • G. I. Arkavenko
    • 1
  1. 1.Physico-Technical Insitute of Low TemperaturesAcademy of Sciences of the Ukrainian SSRKharkov

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