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Vasopressin responses in electrically coupled A7r5 cells

Abstract

Changes in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and in membrane potential were monitored in single A7r5 smooth-muscle cells during spontaneous spiking and after arginine vasopressin stimulation. Spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations, which were associated with the occurrence of action potentials, occurred in about 90% of the confluent monolayers investigated. This spontaneous activity was synchronized amongst all the cells of the monolayer, indicating that the cells were electrically coupled. Arginine vasopressin stimulation produced a [Ca2+]i rise that was about 5 times higher than the amplitude of the spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations and resulted in a subsequent cessation of spontaneous electrical activity and associated Ca2+ spiking, which persisted after [Ca2+]i returned to baseline. Individual cells in the monolayer responded to arginine vasopressin with a different latency. Agonist-induced Ca2+ waves within one cell propagated much more slowly than spontaneous [Ca2+]i rises. We conclude that agonist-induced [Ca2+]i increases in an electrically coupled cell monolayer can be asynchronous.

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Missiaen, L., Oike, M., Bootman, M.D. et al. Vasopressin responses in electrically coupled A7r5 cells. Pflügers Arch. 428, 283–287 (1994). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00724508

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00724508

Key words

  • Ca2+ oscillations
  • Ca2+ wave
  • Smooth muscle
  • Spontaneous electrical activity
  • Ca2+ imaging