Chemistry and Technology of Fuels and Oils

, Volume 7, Issue 3, pp 168–172 | Cite as

Analysis of the operation of experimental equipment for the continuous oxidation of paraffin wax

  • N. M. Lebedeva
  • E. L. Shafranskii
  • A. A. Perchenko
  • V. V. Nesmelov
  • R. Sh. Latypov
  • M. I. Zigmantovich
  • V. P. Finelonov
Petroleum and Gas Processing
  • 16 Downloads

Conclusions

The following conclusions can be drawn from analysis of the results on the enlarged experimental installation at the Novokuibyshevsk Refinery.

  1. 1.

    Continuous oxidation of paraffin wax in a direct-flow multi-section column has a number of advantages over batchwise oxidation:>

     
  2. a)

    the time required under industrial conditions to oxidize paraffin wax to the required depth (30–33% fatty acids) is reduced fourfold (4–4.5 h instead of 16–18h);

     
  3. b)

    the yield of fatty acids per m3 of column per hour increases by a factor of 3.2;

     
  4. c)

    under continuous oxidation conditions there is a considerable reduction in the molecular weight of the acids which is favourably reflected in their fractionalcomposition (yield of C7-C9 acids is 11.2% and C10-C16 acids 37.8% recalculated to 100%-purity).

     
  1. 2.

    During continuous oxidation there is greater possibility of varying the oxidation conditions and of controlling the temperature conditions, which is particularly important in processing paraffin wax of non-standard quality.

     
  2. 3.

    Volatile oxidation products can be trapped in the special cooler-absorber section of the apparatus. The yield of oxidized paraffin wax during continuous oxidation is 98.5% of the feedstock weight.

     

Keywords

Oxidation Molecular Weight Paraffin Oxidation Condition Oxidation Product 

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Literature cited

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    N. M. Lebedeva, L. D. Rysaeva, V. V. Nesmelov, and A. V. Ryzhmanova, Mas-zhir.prom., No. 2 (1966).Google Scholar
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    A. N. Planovskii and D. N. Gurevich, Apparatus for the Semi-Finished Products and Dye Industries [in Russian], Goskhimizdat (1961).Google Scholar
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    R. Sh. Latypov, All-Union Conference on Synthetic Fat Substitutes, Surface Active Substances,and Wetting Agents [in Russian], Shebekino (1965).Google Scholar
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    N. M. Lebedeva, V. V. Nesmelov, L. D. Rysaeva, O. V. Maminov, and R. Sh. Latypov, Khim. i Tekhnol. Topliv i Masel, No. 6 (1969).Google Scholar
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    I. M. Kuznetsova, Dissertation, Kazan (1965).Google Scholar
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    A. W. Dawkins, European Chemical News, No. 2, 49 (1966).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    B. N. Tyutyunnikov and A. S. Drozdov, Mas.-zhir.prom, No. 1 (1969).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Consultants Bureau 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. M. Lebedeva
    • 1
  • E. L. Shafranskii
    • 1
  • A. A. Perchenko
    • 1
  • V. V. Nesmelov
    • 1
  • R. Sh. Latypov
    • 1
  • M. I. Zigmantovich
    • 1
  • V. P. Finelonov
    • 1
  1. 1.Kazan Chemicotechnological Institute (KKhTI), the Novokuibyshevsk Refinery and VNIISINZh (All-Union Scientific-Research Institute for Synthetic Fats)USSR

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