Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease

, Volume 17, Issue 5, pp 593–600 | Cite as

Molecular genetics of Tay-Sachs disease in Japan

  • A. Tanaka
  • H. Sakazaki
  • H. Murakami
  • G. Isshiki
  • K. Suzuki
JSSIEM Meeting

Keywords

Public Health Internal Medicine Molecular Genetic 

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References

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Copyright information

© Society for the Study of Inborn Errors of Metabolism and Kluwer Academic Publishers 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Tanaka
    • 1
  • H. Sakazaki
    • 2
  • H. Murakami
    • 1
  • G. Isshiki
    • 1
  • K. Suzuki
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsOsaka City University School of MedicineOsaka
  2. 2.Department of PediatricsCardiac Center of Hyogo Prefectural Hospital in Amagasaki CityAmagasaki City, HyogoJapan
  3. 3.Brain and Development Research CenterUniversity of North Carolina School of Medicine, CB # 7250, University of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA

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