Multi-stage evaluation for a community mental health system for children

  • Krista Kutash
  • Albert Duchnowski
  • Michael Johnson
  • Deborah Rugs
Articles

Abstract

A model is presented for developing an evaluation of community mental health systems of care for children. This model is divided into three stages. The first, the Program Stage, examines the clients served, service components received, and level of consumer satisfaction. The second, the Effectiveness Stage, analyzes the impact of the service system on the clients it serves, and the Impact Stage, the system changes that may occur due to the operation of a community-based system of care. Several measures and instruments are suggested for use.

Keywords

Public Health Mental Health Health System System Change Service System 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Krista Kutash
    • 1
  • Albert Duchnowski
    • 1
  • Michael Johnson
    • 1
  • Deborah Rugs
    • 1
  1. 1.Research and Training Center for Children's Mental Health, Florida Mental Health Inst.Univ. of South FloridaTampa

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