Metal Science and Heat Treatment

, Volume 21, Issue 9, pp 674–678 | Cite as

Effect of phosphorus, vanadium, and molybdenum on the brittleness of quenched and tempered steel 10KhSND

  • V. I. Bogdanov
  • L. I. Gladshtein
  • V. M. Goritskii
  • G. R. Shneiderov
Strength Characteristics
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Conclusions

  1. 1.

    The development of brittleness in quenched and tempered steel 10KhSND, in contrast to temper brittleness, is accompanied by an increase in the density of particles of the cementite type with a size of ∼0.01μm. In this case the type of dislocation arrays and the size and density of relatively large particles of cementite (∼0.1μm) remain almost unchanged. In the steel with vanadium and nitrogen there is some increase in the size of large particles of cementite located within and in the boundaries of grains.

     
  2. 2.

    Raising the phosphorus content of quenched and tempered steel 10KhSND leads to greater susceptibility to brittleness and a higher percentage of intergranular fracture in the brittle zone, which conforms with the effect of phosphorus on temper brittleness.

     
  3. 3.

    The substantial increase in the strength of the steel additionally alloyed with vanadium and nitrogen causes a considerable increase (ΔT50=260°) in the susceptibility of the steel to brittleness.

     
  4. 4.

    Additional alloying of steel 10KhSND with molybdenum, despite the moderate increase of the strength characteristics (the yield strength increases ∼7 kgf/mm2), greatly increases its resistance to brittleness, which conforms with the favorable effect of molybdenum on temper brittleness.

     

Keywords

Phosphorus Brittleness Vanadium Molybdenum Yield Strength 

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Literature cited

  1. 1.
    L. M. Utevskii, Temper Brittleness of Steel [in Russian], Metallurgizdat, Moscow (1961).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    V. I. Bogdanov et al., “Embrittlement of low-alloy steel 10KhSND with prolonged holding at 340–450°,” Probl. Prochn., No. 5, 65 (1976).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    V. S. D'yakonova et al., “Rate of precipitation of vanadium nitride in steel 08 Fkp,” Metalloved. Term. Obrab. Met., No. 12, 14 (1977).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    V. M. Goritskii and L. I. Gladshtein, “Two types of brittle fracture of quenched and tempered lowalloy steel,” Metalloved. Term. Obrab. Met., No. 10, 33 (1978).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. I. Bogdanov
  • L. I. Gladshtein
  • V. M. Goritskii
  • G. R. Shneiderov

There are no affiliations available

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