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Fraud in mental health practice: A risk management perspective

Abstract

Mental health practitioners sometimes face the dilemma of being ethical and honest and thus not meeting client needs, or of committing fraud to meet those needs. This paper presents some precipitants for fraud in mental health. Some costs of fraud are reviewed for administration, policy, and planning, for ethical and legal issues, and in research. Risk management implications are also examined.

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Maesen, W.A. Fraud in mental health practice: A risk management perspective. Adm Policy Ment Health 18, 421–432 (1991). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00707315

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Keywords

  • Public Health
  • Mental Health
  • Risk Management
  • Health Practice
  • Management Implication