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State hospital curriculum: Public academic liaison for psychiatric education

  • William H. Wilson
  • Sally L. Godard
  • David L. Cutler
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Abstract

State hospitals provide essential services to many of society's most ill and needy individuals. As the next century approaches, state hospitals can best fulfil their missions by developing as high-quality neuropsychiatric/rehabilitation institutes, as opposed to custodial care centers. Highly skilled professionals whose education has included the special knowledge and skill pertinent to state hospitals are central to this development. Although “training units” in state hospitals have existed in many locales, a specific curriculum is often lacking. This article describes the curriculum for psychiatric residents who rotate through the Professional Education Unit at Dammasch State Hospital, as part of the Oregon Public Psychiatry Training Program. The curriculum is described by exploration of the individual learning contract, known as the “Educational Plan,” which guides each resident's work.

Keywords

Individual Learning State Hospital Skilled Professional Education Unit Essential Service 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • William H. Wilson
    • 1
  • Sally L. Godard
    • 2
  • David L. Cutler
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Assistant Director of the Oregon Public Psychiatry Training ProgramDirector of the Professional Education Unit at Dammasch State HospitalOregonUSA
  2. 2.Director of Psychiatric Education at the Oregon Mental Health and Developmental Disability Services DivisionAssociate Director of the Oregon Public Psychiatry Training ProgramOregonUSA
  3. 3.Oregon Health Sciences UniversityOregonUSA
  4. 4.Director of the Oregon Public Psychiatry Training ProgramOregonUSA

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