Surgical Endoscopy

, Volume 2, Issue 4, pp 220–222 | Cite as

Endoscopic observations of the residual cavity after liver hydatid disease surgery

  • E. Eleftheriadis
  • E. Tzartinoglou
  • K. Kotzampassi
  • H. Aletras
Original Articles

Summary

Endoscopic inspection of the residual cavity after liver hydatid disease surgery has the potential of determining the cause of delayed cavity obliteration by providing information about the inner surface condition. We therefore performed endoscopy whenever there was an unsatisfactory rate of reduction of the residual cavity size. Over the last 6 years, 72 patients have been operated upon for liver hydatid disease. Of these, 42 had wide-bore catheter drainage of the echinococcal cavity and 30 had primary surgical closure. In 17 of 42 patients, endoscopy was performed 3–14 months postoperatively, because the cavity showed no evidence of reduction in size. A flexible choledochoscope was passed through the transcutaneous drainage fistula. Silk sutures were found four times and residual parasitic elements were found 3 times. These were all removed. In 13 patients, the cavity was inspected within 6 months postoperatively; their inner cavity surfaces were covered with white soft areolar tissue. The other 4 patients' cavities were examined within 6–14 months; hard fibrous connective tissue was found. Two patients required reoperation, and in both cases the cavity collapsed within 3–12 months postoperatively. We conclude, that endoscopy of the residual cavity is a useful procedure for both recognition and removal of the cause of delay in the cavity obliteration and can lead to collapse of the cavity.

Key words

Hydatid disease Endoscopy Residual echinococcal cavity 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Eleftheriadis
    • 1
  • E. Tzartinoglou
    • 1
  • K. Kotzampassi
    • 1
  • H. Aletras
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SurgeryAristotelian University of ThessalonikiThessalonikiGreece

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