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Plasma ammonia is the principal source of ammonia in sweat

  • Dariusz Czarnowski
  • Jan Górski
  • Jerzy Jóźwiuk
  • Anna Boroń-Kaczmarska
Article

Summary

Sweat contains ammonia. However, neither its source nor factors affecting its concentration in the sweat are known. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of plasma concentrations of ammonia and urea on the concentration of ammonia in the sweat. Four groups of male volunteers were examined: one control, two after ingestion of ammonium chloride, three cirrhotic, hyperammonaemic, four uraemic. Sweat was collected from each subject from the palmar side of the forearm using gauze pads, after previous iontophoresis of pilocarpine. Ammonia and urea concentrations were determined in the sweat and in the plasma. It was found that elevated plasma ammonia concentration in healthy subjects after ingestion of ammonium chloride as well in the cirrhotic patients resulted in an increase of ammonia concentration in the sweat. High plasma and sweat urea concentration in the uraemic subjects did not affect the concentration of ammonia in the sweat. It was concluded that plasma ammonia was the principal source of ammonia in the sweat.

Key words

Ammonia Urea Sweat Plasma Man 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dariusz Czarnowski
    • 1
  • Jan Górski
    • 1
  • Jerzy Jóźwiuk
    • 1
  • Anna Boroń-Kaczmarska
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Physiology, Nephrology, and Infectious DiseasesMedical SchoolBialystokPoland

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