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Agroforestry Systems

, Volume 23, Issue 2–3, pp 177–194 | Cite as

The scope and potential of tree legumes in agroforestry

  • R. C. Gutteridge
  • H. M. Shelton
Article

Abstract

Tree legumes play a vital role in many agroforestry systems currently in use throughout the world. Because of their multipurpose nature they can be used to provide high quality fodder for livestock, nutrient rich mulch for crops, fuelwood and timber, microenvironment amelioration, ecosystem stability, and human food.

Tree legumes are increasingly being used to provide fodder for livestock, as they have a number of unique characteristics which make them attractive for both smallholder and largescale livestock enterprises. Research and development efforts have concentrated on broadening the resource base by evaluating a greater range of tree legume genera, defining optimum management strategies, and developing appropriate systems which capitalize on the advantages of these species.

This paper reviews the role of tree legumes in agroforestry, especially for fodder purposes, outlines the areas of current research focus, and endeavors to highlight some gaps in our knowledge which require further research effort.

Key words

livestock fodder multipurpose trees tree legumes 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. C. Gutteridge
    • 1
  • H. M. Shelton
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AgricultureThe University of QueenslandAustralia

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