GeoJournal

, Volume 5, Issue 4, pp 347–356 | Cite as

Environmental aspects of child growth and nutrition: A case study from Ibadan, Nigeria

  • Rossington Christine E. 
Studies in Medical Geography in Africa
  • 25 Downloads

Abstract

Protein-energy malnutrition, especially among young children, is a major health problem in many developing areas. Its causes are complex and inadequately understood. The paper outlines a pilot survey designed to investigate the impact of economic, demographic and socio-cultural factors on growth and nutrition among a small group of children aged between one and five years from urban poor families living in Ibadan, Nigeria. Field surveys were undertaken between July 1971 and August 1972 using 51 children from the Oje area of the city who formed part of a larger longitudinal study of child growth and development. Records of child growth patterns were compiled from monthly anthropometric measurements and enquiries made into the socio-economic and demographic status of the sample families.

Basic analysis identified periods of growth retardation and seasonal fluctuations in somatic attainments. Multiple correlation analyses attempted to define statistically some of the aspects of the environment which significantly influenced somatic achievements. Relatively low levels of explanation were obtained, emphasising data deficiencies and the complexity of the nutrition problem, but small groups of economic and demographic causative variables were isolated.

Keywords

Multiple Correlation Analysis Nigeria Field Survey Anthropometric Measurement Seasonal Fluctuation 

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Copyright information

© Akademische Verlagsgesellschaft 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rossington Christine E. 
    • 1
  1. 1.Ealing Technical College, UKBracknellUK

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