Virchows Archiv A

, Volume 407, Issue 1, pp 1–12 | Cite as

Immunohistochemical characterization of an anti-epithelial monoclonal antibody (mAB lu-5)

  • J. von Overbeck
  • C. Stähli
  • F. Gudat
  • H. Carmann
  • C. Lautenschlager
  • U. Dürmüller
  • B. Takacs
  • V. Miggiano
  • Th. Staehelin
  • Ph. U. Heitz
Article

Summary

A mouse monoclonal antibody (mAB lu-5) was prepared using a lung cancer cell line as an antigen. The selected clone produces an IgG with a gamma-1 heavy chain and a kappa-light-chain. Immunohistochemical testing of mAB lu-5 on 117 normal tissue biopsies and 474 tumours revealed reactivity with an intracytoplasmic, formaldehyderesistant antigen present in most epithelial and mesothelial cells, but absent in mesenchymal cells. The antibody can therefore be used as a first order, pan-epithelial marker. It proved also useful for fast tumour diagnosis on frozen sections.

Key words

Monoclonal pan-epithelial antibody Immunohistochemistry Tumour diagnosis 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. von Overbeck
    • 1
  • C. Stähli
    • 2
  • F. Gudat
    • 1
  • H. Carmann
    • 2
  • C. Lautenschlager
    • 1
  • U. Dürmüller
    • 1
  • B. Takacs
    • 2
  • V. Miggiano
    • 2
  • Th. Staehelin
    • 2
  • Ph. U. Heitz
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PathologyUniversity of BaselBasel
  2. 2.Central Research DepartmentF. Hoffmann-La Roche CoBaselSwitzerland

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