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Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry

, Volume 18, Issue 2, pp 149–169 | Cite as

Experimental determination of HONO mass accommodation coefficients using two different techniques

  • A. Bongartz
  • J. Kames
  • U. Schurath
  • Ch. George
  • Ph. Mirabel
  • J. L. Ponche
Article

Abstract

The mass accommodation coefficient αHONO of gaseous nitrous acid on water surfaces has been determined in a cooperation between the Universities of Strasbourg and Bonn. The droplet train technique (Strasbourg) yielded 0.04<αHONO<0.09 for an estimated surface temperature of 245 K, while the liquid jet technique (Bonn) yielded 0.03<αHONO<0.15 for a surface temperature of 297 K. The uncertainty ranges allow for experimental scatter and estimated uncertainties in diffusion coefficients. The same HONO source and analytical equipment were used for both experiments, which were run in parallel. The results indicate that the exchange rate of HONO between atmospheric water droplets and interstitial air is not inhibited by interfacial resistance.

Key words

Mass accommodation coefficient nitrous acid absorption cross section mondisperse droplets liquid jet interfacial resistance 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Bongartz
    • 1
  • J. Kames
    • 1
  • U. Schurath
    • 1
  • Ch. George
    • 2
  • Ph. Mirabel
    • 2
  • J. L. Ponche
    • 2
  1. 1.Institut für Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie der Universität BonnBonn 1Germany
  2. 2.Centre de Géochimie de la Surface and Chemistry DepartmentUniversité Louis PasteurStrasbourgFrance

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