Biodegradation

, Volume 6, Issue 4, pp 275–281 | Cite as

Effects of organic compounds on the degradation ofp-nitrophenol in lake and industrial wastewater by inoculated bacteria

  • Baqar R. Zaidi
  • Narinder K. Mehta
Articles

Abstract

Many microorganisms fail to degrade pollutants when introduced in different natural environments. This is a problem in selecting inocula for bioremediation of polluted sites. Thus, a study was conducted to determine the success of four inoculants to degradep-nitrophenol (PNP) in lake and industrial wastewater and the effects of organic compounds on the degradation of high and low concentrations of PNP in these environments.Corynebacterium strain Z4 when inoculated into the lake and wastewater samples containing 20 µg/ml of PNP degraded 90% of PNP in one day. Addition of 100 µg/ml of glucose as a second substrate did not enhance the degradation of PNP and the bacterium utilized the two substrates simultaneously. Glucose used at the same concentration (100 µg/ml), inhibited degradation of 20 µg of PNP in wastewater byPseudomonas strain MS. However, glucose increased the extent of degradation of PNP byPseudomonas strain GR. Phenol also enhanced the degradation of PNP in wastewater byPseudomonas strain GR, but had no effect on the degradation of PNP byCorynebacterium strain Z4.

Addition of 100 µg/ml of glucose as a second substrate into the lake water samples containing low concentration of PNP (26 ng/ml) enhanced the degradation of PNP and the growth ofCorynebacterium strain Z4. In the presence of glucose, it grew from 2×104 to 4×104 cells/ml in 3 days and degraded 70% of PNP as compared to samples without glucose in which the bacterium declined in cell number from 2×104 to 8×103 cells/ml and degraded only 30% PNP. The results suggest that in inoculation to enhance biodegradation, depending on the inoculant, second organic substrate many play an important role in controlling the rate and extent of biodegradation of organic compounds.

Key words

biodegradation p-nitrophenol Pseudomonas Corynebacterium 

Abbreviations

PNP

p-nitrophenol

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Baqar R. Zaidi
    • 1
  • Narinder K. Mehta
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Marine SciencesUniversity of Puerto RicoMayaguezUSA
  2. 2.Department of Chemical EngineeringUniversity of Puerto RicoMayaguezUSA

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