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Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 28, Issue 2, pp 116–127 | Cite as

Modelling the dynamic behaviour ofSaccharomyces cerevisiae and its application in control experiments

  • A. P. J. Sweere
  • J. Giesselbach
  • R. Barendse
  • R. de Krieger
  • G. Honderd
  • K. C. A. M. Luyben
Biotechnology

Summary

A simple structured model describing the response of a baker's yeast culture to a glucose pulse is presented. The model is based on a limited oxidation capacity of yeast leading to a switchover from oxidative to oxido-reductive metabolism. The maximum specific consumption rates of glucose, ethanol and oxygen are modelled by first order transfer functions. These maximum rates have also been estimated experimentally as a function of the dilution rate in a continuous culture. The rates predicted by the model correspond to the measured maximum specific consumption rates. So, the model can describe a continuous culture of baker's yeast very well. The applicability of the model is tested by inserting it in a control loop and comparing the response of the model with the results of a controlled fermentation.

The model behaved satisfactorily for the description of the pulse experiment as well as during the simulation of the control experiments. Although the model for balanced growth was rejected in simulating pulse responses, its results were conveniently when inserted in a control loop.

Keywords

Fermentation Dilution Rate Continuous Culture Control Loop Limited Oxidation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Nomenclature

Ci

concentration (mol/l)

D

dilution rate (h-1)

Fi

production or consumption rate (mol/h)

fic

induction or repression factor

Ki

saturation constant (mol/l)

Kl

inhibition constant (mol/l)

Km

substrate saturation constant for the induction of the production of oxidation capacity (mol/l)

Kn

glucose saturation constant for the induction of the production of glucose consumption capacity (mol/l)

kLa

volumetric mass transfer coefficient based on the liquid volume (h-1)

M

molecular weight (g/mol)

m

gas liquid distribution coefficient (mol/mol)

Qi

specific consumption or production rate (mol/(mol·h))

RQ

respiration quotient (mol/mol)

s

Laplace variable

t

time (h)

Yij

yield of componentj oni (mol/mol)

μ

specific growth rate (h-1)

τ

time constant (h)

τ

gas flow rate (l/h)

Subscripts

a

acetic acid

c, CO2

carbondioxide

e

ethanol

g

gas phase

gl

glycerol

I

inhibition

i

component

l

liquid phase

lim

limited capacity

max

maximum

o, O2

oxygen

ox

oxidative

pr

production

red

reductive

s

substrate

x

biomass

Superscripts

ox

oxidative

p

parameter value for balanced growth

red

reductive

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. P. J. Sweere
    • 1
  • J. Giesselbach
    • 2
  • R. Barendse
    • 1
  • R. de Krieger
    • 1
  • G. Honderd
    • 2
  • K. C. A. M. Luyben
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biochemical EngineeringDelft University of TechnologyDelftThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of Control EngineeringDelft University of TechnologyDelftThe Netherlands

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