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Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology

, Volume 31, Supplement 1, pp S93–S98 | Cite as

Clinical evaluation of intermittent arterial infusion chemotherapy with an implanted reservoir for hepatocellular carcinoma

  • Kenji Nakamura
  • Sumio Takashima
  • Keiji Takada
  • Keiji Fujimoto
  • Toshio Kaminou
  • Haruki Nakatsuka
  • Kazuo Minakuchi
  • Yasuto Onoyama
Session II: Treatment for Inoperable Patients TACE, Infusion Reservoir and Radiotherapy Hepatocellular Carcinoma, Therapy-Intervention Radiology, Chemotherapy-Intermittent Arterial Infusion, Implanted Reservoir

Summary

A total of 45 patients with advanced hepato-cellular carcinoma were treated at Osaka City University Hospital by intermittent arterial infusion chemotherapy with an implanted reservoir. The treatment consisted of intermittent infusion of doxorubicin (5–20 mg/body), mitomycin C (4–10 mg/body) or degradable starch microspheres (600–1200 mg/body) plus doxorubicin (30 mg/body). In all, 26% of the patients received this treatment for disease recurrence following transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). Among 43 evaluable patients, 4 showed a complete remission (CR) and 16 showed a partial response (PR) on computed tomograms and angiograms. For all 45 patients, the 1-year survival value was 41% and the 2-year value was 14%. Of the 20 patients who showed a CR or PR, 77% survived for 1 year and 29% survived for 2 years. Tumor regression showed a close relationship with the duration of survival. Intermittent arterial infusion with an implanted reservoir caused the least adverse reactions and seems to be appropriate for use in patients with advanced tumor extension or stenosis of the hepatic artery caused by repeated TAE.

Keywords

Starch Doxorubicin Partial Response Complete Remission Hepatic Artery 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenji Nakamura
    • 1
  • Sumio Takashima
    • 1
  • Keiji Takada
    • 1
  • Keiji Fujimoto
    • 1
  • Toshio Kaminou
    • 1
  • Haruki Nakatsuka
    • 1
  • Kazuo Minakuchi
    • 1
  • Yasuto Onoyama
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of RadiologyOsaka City University School of MedicineOsakaJapan

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