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Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology

, Volume 30, Issue 1, pp 21–24 | Cite as

Cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetics of carboplatin in children with brain tumors

  • R. Riccardi
  • A. Riccardi
  • C. Di Rocco
  • G. Carelli
  • R. L. Tartaglia
  • A. Lasorella
  • T. Servidei
  • R. Mastrangelo
Original Articles Cerebrospinal Fluid, Carboplatin, Brain Tumors

Summary

The pharmacokinetics of carboplatin in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma was studied in five children with brain tumors (four medulloblastomas and one ependimoblastoma) who underwent preirradiation treatment with carboplatin. Carboplatin pharmacokinetics was studied following the administration of 600 mg/m2 as a 1-h infusion. Four children were treated a few weeks after surgery, whereas one child with an unresectable tumor was treated prior to surgery. All patients had a ventricular-peritoneal CSF shunt connected to a subcutaneous reservoir. Total platinum and free carboplatin were measured. The mean AUC values for free carboplatin in CSF and plasma were 2.29±1.20 and 8.18±1.27 mg ml−1 min, respectively. The mean ratio of CSF AUC to plasma AUC was 0.28 (range, 0.17–0.46). Both plasma peak levels and AUC values showed limited interpatient variability. On the other hand, carboplatin levels in CSF showed substantial interpatient variability, with a>5-fold difference in peak levels and a 3-fold difference in AUC values being recorded. The interpatient difference in CSF pharmacokinetics may have been related at least in part to the different anatomical alterations induced by the surgical procedures or by the presence of a large tumor mass. In the four evaluable patients exhibiting macroscopic residual tumor, we observed one complete remission (CR) and two partial remissions (PR) following two cycles that consisted of two doses of 600 mg/m2 carboplatin given on 2 consecutive days (total dose, 1200 mg/m2) and were separated by a l-month interval. These results may give some indication as to the optimal dose and schedule for carboplatin administration in the treatment of primitive neuroectodermic tumors (PNET).

Keywords

Carboplatin Medulloblastoma Primitive Neuroectodermic Tumor Interpatient Variability Plasma Peak Level 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Riccardi
    • 3
  • A. Riccardi
    • 3
  • C. Di Rocco
    • 1
  • G. Carelli
    • 2
  • R. L. Tartaglia
    • 3
  • A. Lasorella
    • 3
  • T. Servidei
    • 3
  • R. Mastrangelo
    • 3
  1. 1.Section of Pediatric NeurosurgeryCatholic University of RomeItaly
  2. 2.Department of Occupational MedicineCatholic University of RomeItaly
  3. 3.Division of Pediatric OncologyCatholic UniversityRomeItaly

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