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Metal Science and Heat Treatment

, Volume 19, Issue 8, pp 706–708 | Cite as

Die steels with high heat resistance and toughness

  • Yu. A. Geller
  • T. G. Sagadeeva
  • A. M. Tokmin
Technical Information
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Conclusions

  1. 1.

    Steels for pressing high-strength alloys must contain M6C carbide in order to retain a high yield strength (80–120 kgf/mm2) at temperatures up to 650–720°.

     
  2. 2.

    The heat resistance is highest (730–740°) and the notch toughness lowest (an=0.8–1.5 kgf-m/cm2) for the steel with ∼8–9% W.

     
  3. 3.

    Steels of the first group (2Kh6V8M2K8 type) are intended for pressing without substantial dynamic loads and intensive cooling. They should be quenched from 1190–1210° and tempered at 700–710° (HRC 50-51) or 745–750° (HRC 45-46). Steels of the second group (2Kh5V5M2K5 type) are used for pressing with dynamic loads and intensive cooling. They are quenched from 1190–1230° and tempered at 620–625° (HRC 50-51) or at 680–685° (HRC 45-46).

     

Keywords

Carbide Yield Strength High Heat Dynamic Load Heat Resistance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Literature cited

  1. 1.
    L. S. Kremnev, Yu. A. Geller, and T. G. Sagadeva, “Steels for hot deformation of hard-to-work alloys,” ‘Stal’, No. 12, 1118 (1970).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Yu. A. Geller, Tool Steels [in Russian], Metallurgiya, Moscow (1975).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    L. S. Kremnev and V. A. Brostrem, “Heat resistance of tool steels and alloys,” Metalloved. Term. Obrab. Met., No. 3, 46 (1973).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yu. A. Geller
  • T. G. Sagadeeva
  • A. M. Tokmin

There are no affiliations available

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