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Archiv für Gynäkologie

, Volume 218, Issue 3, pp 233–241 | Cite as

How do oocytes disappear?

  • F. Bonilla-Musoles
  • J. Renau
  • J. Hernandez-Yago
  • y. J. Torres
Article

Summary

It has been study using transmision and scanner electron microscopy the mean procedures of dessaparence of the oocytes.

On described three methods:
  1. 1.

    The necrosis of the oocytes.

     
  2. 2.

    The autolysis and fagocitosis by granulosa cells.

     
  3. 3.

    The migration of those to the superphicie and fall into the peritoneal cavity. Using the scanner electron microscopy in ovaries of fetus and newborn it seems the latest method to bee the most important during the intrauterine life. After the birth, this last phenomenon seems to disappear.

     

Keywords

Public Health Electron Microscopy Scanner Electron Microscopy Peritoneal Cavity Granulosa Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© J. F. Bergmann 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Bonilla-Musoles
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. Renau
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. Hernandez-Yago
    • 1
    • 2
  • y. J. Torres
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Faculty of MedicineFRG
  2. 2.Centro de Investigaciones Citologicas de la Caja de Ahorros y Monte de PiedadValencia

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