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Surveys in Geophysics

, Volume 16, Issue 2, pp 201–225 | Cite as

The influence of storm characteristics and catchment conditions on extreme flood response : A case study based on the brue river basin, U.K.

  • A. Suyanto
  • P. E. O'Connell
  • A. V. Metcalfe
Article

Abstract

Methods for estimating the magnitude of extreme floods are reviewed. A method which combines a probabilistic storm transposition technique with a physically-based distributed rainfallrunoff model is described. Synthetic storms with detailed spatial and temporal distributions are generated and applied to the calibrated model of the Brue river basin, U.K. (area 135 km2). The variability of catchment response due to storm characteristics (storm area, storm duration, storm movement, storm shape and within storm variation) and initial catchment wetness conditions is investigated. A probabilistic approach to estimating the return periods of extreme catchment responses is suggested.

Key words

Extreme floods Storm transposition Rainfall-runoff models SHE 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Suyanto
    • 1
  • P. E. O'Connell
    • 1
  • A. V. Metcalfe
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Civil EngineeringUniversity of Newcastle upon TyneUnited Kingdom
  2. 2.Department of Engineering MathematicsUniversity of Newcastle upon TyneUnited Kingdom

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