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Journal of comparative physiology

, Volume 123, Issue 4, pp 329–333 | Cite as

Trigeminal sensory neurons of the sea lamprey

  • Gary Matthews
  • Warren O. Wickelgren
Article

Summary

Intracellular recordings were made from neurons of the trigeminal sensory ganglia of young adult sea lampreys. Receptive fields were mapped, and four classes of sensory cells were identified. Touch cells gave rapidly adapting responses to indentation of the skin. Pressure cells gave slowly adapting responses to indentation of the skin. Pit organ cells gave slowly adapting responses to mechanical stimulation of single lateral line pit organs. Nociceptive cells gave slowly adapting responses to destructive stimuli, such as puncture or burning of the skin. The axons of nociceptive cells had longer refractory periods and slower conduction velocities than did the axons of the other types of cell, indicating that nociceptive cells had smaller diameter axons.

Keywords

Receptive Field Conduction Velocity Lateral Line Refractory Period Sensory Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary Matthews
    • 1
  • Warren O. Wickelgren
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyUniversity of Colorado Medical CenterDenverUSA

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