Pflügers Archiv

, Volume 407, Issue 4, pp 445–450 | Cite as

Muscle economy of isometric contractions as a function of stimulation time and relative muscle length

  • A. de Haan
  • J. de Jong
  • J. E. van Doorn
  • P. A. Huijing
  • R. D. Woittiez
  • H. G. Westra
Heart, Circulation, Respiration and Blood; Environmental and Exercise Physiology

Abstract

For rat medial gastrocnemius muscle economy (i.e. the ratio of time integral of force and total energy-rich phosphate consumption) was calculated. Muscles in situ at 35°C were stimulated to perform either one continuous or several repetitive isometric contractions at one muscle length in the range from 70% to 130% of optimum muscle length for force generation. Whereas during one continuous contraction economy increased, no differences in economy were found between 6, 12 or 18 successive contractions. Economy during intermittent exercise was always lower than during continuous exercise. The difference in economy is a result of different rates of metabolism, whereas no difference was found for force generation. Economy was highest at optimum muscle length for force generation and decreased at muscle lengths smaller as well as greather than optimum muscle length. Force-dependent energy consumption was calculated by substracting the force-independent part (obtained by extrapolation) from total energy consumption. The calculated force produced per μmol force-dependent energy-rich phosphate consumption was similar in muscles stretched beyond optimum length. In contrast, a decreasing amount of force per μmol force-dependent energy-rich phosphate consumption was observed at lengths smaller than optimum length.

Key words

Energy metabolism Successive isometric contractions Muscle length Architecture 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. de Haan
    • 1
  • J. de Jong
    • 1
  • J. E. van Doorn
    • 2
  • P. A. Huijing
    • 3
  • R. D. Woittiez
    • 3
  • H. G. Westra
    • 2
  1. 1.Working Group of Exercise Physiology and Health, Interfaculty of Physical EducationUniversity of Amsterdam and Free UniversityAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Coronel Laboratory, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Department of Functional of Anatomy, Interfaculty of Physical EducationFree UniversityAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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