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Metal Science and Heat Treatment

, Volume 11, Issue 8, pp 613–616 | Cite as

Effect of carbon, silicon, iron, and tungsten on the structure and phase composition of alloy N70KhM

  • T. V. Svistunova
  • N. F. Chermenskaya
  • A. V. Smirnova
  • E. F. Yakovleva
  • L. V. Stegnukhina
  • D. N. Zharkova
Heat Resistant Steels and Alloys
  • 37 Downloads

Conclusions

  1. 1.

    The structure and phase composition of nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys of the 15 Cr-15 Mo system quenched in watr from 1200°C and aged at 800–1000°C depend on the concentration of carbon, silicon, iron, and tungsten.

     
  2. 2.

    In alloy N70KhM with 0.03% C and 0.06% Si particles of dispersed intermetallic phase, probably P or N phase, are observed along with M6C carbide in the grain boundaries and boundary areas.

     
  3. 3.

    In the N70KhM alloy with 0.04% Si carbon induces the formation of M6C carbide with a lattice constant of 11.06 kX.

     
  4. 4.

    In the N70KhM alloy with 0.03% C silicon induces precipitation of cubic M6C carbide with a lattice constant of 10.86 kX in the grain boundaries; on prolonged heating a hexagonal phase of the AB2 type is also precipitated in the grain boundaries and within the grains.

     
  5. 5.

    In the N70KhM alloy with 0.03% C and 0.06% Si tungsten induces precipitation of M6C carbide in the grain boundaries and hexagonal μ-phase of the Co7Mo6 type in separate sections of the boundaries and boundary areas; nickel, chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten enter into its composition.

     
  6. 6.

    Alloying of N65KhMV with both silicon and iron induces precipitation of μ-phase of the Co7Mo6 type, into the composition of which enter nickel, molybdenum, chromium, and tungsten, and also silicon and iron.

     

Keywords

Iron Silicon Nickel Chromium Hexagonal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Literature cited

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Copyright information

© Consultants Bureau 1970

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. V. Svistunova
  • N. F. Chermenskaya
  • A. V. Smirnova
  • E. F. Yakovleva
  • L. V. Stegnukhina
  • D. N. Zharkova

There are no affiliations available

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