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Effects of order of presentation of exercise intensities and of sauna baths on perceived exertion during treadmill running

  • P. J. N. Bloem
  • L. M. G. C. Goessens
  • P. Zamparo
  • M. Sacher
  • R. Paviotti
  • P. E. di Prampero
Article

Summary

Thirteen male subjects performed a running test on the treadmill consisting of four standard exercise intensities [65%, 75%, 85%, 95% maximal O2 uptake (VO2max)] presented in ascending, descending or random order. At the end of each exercise intensity, O2 consumption, heart rate (fc), venous blood lactate concentration ([la]b) and perceived exertion were assessed. This last variable was determined according to the Borg nonlinear CR-20 scale. The same variables were also determined during exercise at a standard intensity (65% or 95%VO2max) performed before and after a Finnish sauna bath. Ratings of perceived exertion showed a good test-retest reliability (r=0.77); they were the same when the exercise intensity was expressed in relative (%VO2max) or absolute (speed) terms, and were independent of the order of presentation of the exercise. The latter had no effect onfc either but it did, however, influence [la]b, which was significantly higher in the descending, as compared to the ascending or random modes of presentation. The sauna bath increasedfc at a given exercise intensity, but left perceived exertion and [la]b unchanged. It was concluded that at least under the present experimental conditions,fc and venous [la]b do not play a major role as determinants of perceived exertion.

Key words

Perceived exertion Sauna bath Blood lactate Heart rate Running 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. J. N. Bloem
    • 1
  • L. M. G. C. Goessens
    • 1
  • P. Zamparo
    • 2
  • M. Sacher
    • 2
  • R. Paviotti
    • 2
  • P. E. di Prampero
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Exercise Physiology and Health Science, Faculty of Human Movement SciencesFree UniversityAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Institute of BiologySchool of MedicineUdineItaly

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