Astrophysics and Space Science

, Volume 129, Issue 2, pp 293–302 | Cite as

Age distribution of open clusters as a function of their linear diameter and age-dependence of cluster masses

  • A. K. Pandey
  • B. C. Bhatt
  • H. S. Mahra
Article

Abstract

From the well-observed data of star clusters, the age distribution of galactic clusters is obtianed as a function of their linear diameter and it is concluded that the observed age distribution of clusters for different linear diameter intervals within 1500 pc, is not seriously affected by the selection effects. If we assume that the rate of formation of clusters is constant, the lifetimes τ1/2 of the clusters for different linear diameter intervals have been obtained and it is found that the clusters with a linear diameter in the range 0–1.9 pc have longer lifetimes than the clusters having linear diameters larger than 2.0 pc.

Total masses of 57 clusters have been obtained using the catalogues of Piskunov (1983) and Myakutinet al. (1984). A study of age-dependence of cluster masses, based on the total masses of the clusters obtained in the present study and the cluster masses given by Bruch and Sanders (1983) and Lynga (1983b), shows that there is a decreasing trend in the total mass with the age, however, there is an increasing trend after the age of about 108 yr. It is also concluded that the initial rate of formation of rich clusters was relatively higher than the present rate of formation.

Keywords

Total Mass Initial Rate Selection Effect Present Rate Open Cluster 

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Copyright information

© D. Reidel Publishing Company 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. K. Pandey
    • 1
  • B. C. Bhatt
    • 1
  • H. S. Mahra
    • 1
  1. 1.Uttar Pradesh State ObservatoryNaini TalIndia

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