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Relationship between the efficiency of muscular work during jumping and the energetics of running

  • C. Bosco
  • G. Montanari
  • R. Ribacchi
  • P. Giovenali
  • F. Latteri
  • G. Iachelli
  • M. Faina
  • R. Colli
  • A. Dal Monte
  • M. La Rosa
  • G. Cortili
  • F. Saibene
Article

Summary

The running economy of seventeen athletes was studied during running at a low speed (3.3 m · s−1) on a motor-driven treadmill. The net energetic cost during running expressed in kJ·kg−1·km−1 was on average 4.06. As expected, a positive relationship was found between the energetic cost and the percentage of fast twitch fibres (r=0.60,n=17,p<0.01). In addition, the mechanical efficiency during two different series of jumps performed with and without prestretch was measured in thirteen subjects. The effect of prestretch on muscle economy was represented by the ratio between the efficiency of muscular work performed during prestretch jumps and the corresponding value calculated in no prestretch conditions. This ratio demonstrated a statistically significant relationship with energy expenditure during running (r=−0.66,n=13,P<0.01), suggesting that the elastic behaviour of leg extensor muscles is similar in running and jumping if the speeds of muscular contraction during eccentric and concentric work are of similar magnitudes.

Key words

Muscle mechanics Muscle efficiency Stretch-shortening cycle Muscle elasticity Fibre types 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Bosco
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. Montanari
    • 2
  • R. Ribacchi
    • 3
  • P. Giovenali
    • 3
  • F. Latteri
    • 4
  • G. Iachelli
    • 4
  • M. Faina
    • 5
  • R. Colli
    • 5
  • A. Dal Monte
    • 5
  • M. La Rosa
    • 6
  • G. Cortili
    • 7
  • F. Saibene
    • 7
  1. 1.Laboratory of Sports Biomechanics and Exercise PhysiologyKuortane Sport InstituteKuortane OPFinland
  2. 2.Centro Studi e RicercheFIDALRoma
  3. 3.Istitutio Anatomia PatologiaUniversita'di PerugiaItaly
  4. 4.Facolta'di Medicina e ChirurgiaUniversita'di CataniaItaly
  5. 5.Dipartimento di Fisiologia e Biomeccanica dello SportInstituto di Scienze dello SportRoma
  6. 6.Facolta'di Medicina e ChirurgiaUniversita CattolicaRoma
  7. 7.Centro Studi di Fisiologia del Lavoro Muscolare del CNRMilanoItaly

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