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Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology

, Volume 77, Issue 2, pp 150–157 | Cite as

Agents of low temperature ocean crust alteration

  • Hubert Staudigel
  • Karlis Muehlenbachs
  • Stephen H. Richardson
  • Stanley R. Hart
Article

Abstract

δ18O and87Sr/86Sr isotopic data from smectites, calcites, and whole rocks, together with published isotopic age determinations, alkali element concentration data and petrographic observations suggest a sequential model of ocean floor alteration. The early stage lasts about 3 m.y. and is characterized by palagonite and smectite formation, and solutions with a large basaltic component, increasing with temperature which varies from 15° to 80° C at DSDP site 418A. Most carbonates are depositedafter this stage from solutions with a negligible basaltic Sr component and temperatures of 15° to 40° C. Water of seawater Sr and O isotopic composition is shown to percolate to at least 500 m into the basaltic basement. No evidence was found for continuing exchange of strontium or oxygen after 3 m.y.

Keywords

Calcite Strontium Ocean Crust Percolate Temperature Ocean 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hubert Staudigel
    • 1
    • 2
  • Karlis Muehlenbachs
    • 3
  • Stephen H. Richardson
    • 1
  • Stanley R. Hart
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Geoalchemy, Department of Earth & Planetary SciencesMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA
  2. 2.Institut für MineralogieRuhr Universität BochumBochumWest Germany
  3. 3.Department of GeologyUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada

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