Met-enkephalin, β-endorphin and cortisol responses to sub-maximal exercise after sleep disturbances

  • F. Mougin
  • M. L. Simon-Rigaud
  • C. Mougin
  • H. Bourdin
  • M. C. Jacquier
  • M. T. Henriet
  • D. Davenne
  • J. P. Kantelip
  • P. Magnin
  • R. C. Gaillard
Article

Summary

The present study compared the effects of partial sleep deprivation and the effects of an intake of a hypnotic compound (zolpidem) prior to bedtime, on sleep and on hormonal and metabolic adaptations to subsequent exercise. Sleep deprivation consisted of a delayed bedtime and an early getting-up time. Eight young subjects, who slept well and were highly trained athletes, were enrolled in this study. Sleep was recorded polygraphically and the following afternoon exercise was performed on a cycle ergometer for 30 min at 75% of maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) after a 10-min warm up. Met-enkephalin, β-endorphin, cortisol, and lactate concentrations were measured at rest and during exercise. The data obtained after experimental sleep, with and without medication were compared with those obtained in the reference condition with normal sleep. Both types of sleep reduction decreased the total sleep time, stage 2 sleep, and rapid eye movement sleep, whereas zolpidem administration did not modify either the duration of sleep or the sleep stages. After the reference night, plasma met-enkephalin did not show any significant change at the end of the submaximal exercise, whereas β-endorphin, cortisol, and lactic acid concentrations increased significantly in all subjects. The changes in concentration in β-endorphin were significantly related to the changes in cortisol (r=0.78;P<0.01) and to the changes in plasma lactic acid (r=0.58;P<0.05). Cortisol concentrations were also related to lactic acid values (r=0.94;P<0.01). Partial sleep loss altered lactate concentrations during submaximal exercise but did not affect the hormonal levels of met-enkephalin, β-endorphin and cortisol in the blood. Zolpidem administration failed to change lactate and hormone concentrations. These results suggested that partial sleep deprivation may have contributed to the changes in metabolic responses without significantly altering the hormonal response to exercise. Zolpidem intake did not impair the response of different variables to exercise the following day.

Key words

Sleep Zolpidem Met-enkephalin β-Endorphin Cortisol Lactate 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Mougin
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. L. Simon-Rigaud
    • 1
  • C. Mougin
    • 3
  • H. Bourdin
    • 1
  • M. C. Jacquier
    • 4
  • M. T. Henriet
    • 5
  • D. Davenne
    • 2
  • J. P. Kantelip
    • 1
  • P. Magnin
    • 1
  • R. C. Gaillard
    • 4
  1. 1.Service de Physiopathologie Respiratoire et CérébraleMédecine et Biologie du SportBesançon CedexFrance
  2. 2.Laboratoire d'Etudes et de Recherches sur la Performance SportiveDijon CedexFrance
  3. 3.Laboratoire de VirologieBesançon CedexFrance
  4. 4.Clinique MédicaleHôpital Cantonal UniversitaireGenéveSwitzerland
  5. 5.Laboratoire d'Explorations Fonctionnelles Métaboliques et RénalesBesançon CedexFrance

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