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Role of agonist and antagonist muscle strength in performance of rapid movements

  • Slobodan Jarić
  • Robert Ropret
  • Miloš Kukolj
  • Duško B. Ilić
Original Article

Abstract

Six subjects performed rapid self-terminated elbow movements under different mechanical conditions prior to, and 5 weeks after an elbow extensor strengthening programme. Despite the large difference in the strengths of elbow flexors and extensors, the pretest did not demonstrate significant differences between the movement time of flexion and extension movements performed under the same mechanical conditions. The results obtained in the posttest demonstrated a decrease in movement time (i.e. an increase in movement speed) in both elbow flexion and extension movements under some mechanical conditions. In addition, flexion movements demonstrated a relative increase in the acceleration time (acceleration time as a proportion of the movement time). It was concluded that the strength of both the agonist and antagonist muscles was important for the performance of rapid movements. Stronger agonists could increase the acceleration of the limb being moved, while stronger antagonists could facilitate the arrest of the limb movement in a shorter time, providing a longer time for acceleration.

Key words

Movement performance Muscle strength Agonists Antagonists 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Slobodan Jarić
    • 1
  • Robert Ropret
    • 1
  • Miloš Kukolj
    • 1
  • Duško B. Ilić
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty for Physical CultureBelgradeYugoslavia

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