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European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

, Volume 4, Issue 4, pp 228–232 | Cite as

The effect of pindolol, a beta-receptor blocking agent, in heart rate and blood-pressure during submaximal and maximal exercise

  • F. Gyntelberg
  • I. Persson
  • L. Frische
  • J. Ulrich
Originals

Summary

The effect of a new beta-receptor blocking agent, 4-2 (2-hydroxy-3-isopropylaminopropoxy)-indole, pindolol (Viskén®), was investigated in patients with essential hypertension of WHO grades I–II. Maximal and submaximal working capacity tests were done before and during treatment in 30 patients. 15 patients underwent a double-blind cross-over trial with placebo; and a further 15 patients were examined in an open study including a multiscaled working capacity test. The work tests were performed on a bicycle ergometer with increasing loads. The ECG was recorded continuously, and the blood-pressure was measured with a cuff. — In both groups the heart rate and systolic blood-pressure decreased significantly during treatment with Viskén, both at rest and during exercise. The resting and post-exercise diastolic blood-pressures were also significantly reduced after beta-receptor blockade with Viskén. No ECG signs of myocardial ischemia were found. The work capacity tests showed a slight reduction, of about 100 kpm/min, in four patients, whilst three improved their maximal working capacity.

Key words

beta-blockade substituted indoles hypertension work capacity clinical trial 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Gyntelberg
    • 1
  • I. Persson
    • 1
  • L. Frische
    • 1
  • J. Ulrich
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Clinical Physiology and Medical Dept. C Bispebjerg Hospital and Medical Dept. Sankt Lukas Stiftelsens HospitalCopenhagenDenmark

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