Theoretical Medicine

, Volume 10, Issue 1, pp 35–42 | Cite as

Approving the use of animals in medical education

  • Farol N. Tomson
Article

Abstract

Animals have been and will continue to be used in educational programs, but some concerns about the responsibility for assuring their proper care and humane use need to be discussed. Research animals have been regulated and monitored quite successfully by Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees (IACUC). These Committees are extending their responsibilities to cover animals used in educational programs. Three common roles of these IACUCs are described, including oversight, investigative and training responsibilities. Guidelines developed for faculty using animals at the University of Florida are presented and discussed.

Key words

animal care committee animals IACUC medical education 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Farol N. Tomson
    • 1
  1. 1.Institutional Animal Care and Use CommitteeUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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