Journal of comparative physiology

, Volume 108, Issue 1, pp 45–52 | Cite as

Integration between statocyst sensory neurons and oculomotor neurons in the crabScylla serrata

II. The thread hair sensory receptors
  • G. E. Silvey
  • P. A. Dunn
  • D. C. Sandeman
Article

Summary

  1. 1.

    Electrical recordings were taken from the axons of the thread hair receptors of a crab statocyst which was removed from the animal but which remained otherwise intact.

     
  2. 2.

    Sinusoidal oscillation of the intact statocyst about its yaw and pitch axes show that the upper group of thread hair receptors code angular velocity only about the yaw axis and the lower thread hairs code angular velocity only about the pitch axis.

     
  3. 3.

    There are two distinct populations of thread hairs in both the upper and lower groups of thread hairs. These are excited by angular displacement of the statocyst in one direction and inhibited by angular displacement in the other direction. Thus angular displacement of the statocyst in any direction will lead to an increase in excitation in one group of receptor cells.

     

Keywords

Angular Velocity Receptor Cell Sensory Neuron Distinct Population Angular Displacement 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. E. Silvey
    • 1
  • P. A. Dunn
    • 1
  • D. C. Sandeman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Neurobiology, Research School of Biological SciencesAustralian National UniversityCanberraAustralia

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