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European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

, Volume 24, Issue 2, pp 173–178 | Cite as

Ventilatory and haemodynamic effects of prenalterol and terbutaline in asthmatic patients

  • A. P. M. Greefhorst
  • C. L. A. van Herwaarden
Originals

Summary

In 8 asthmatic patients a comparative study was performed of the ventilatory and haemodynamic effects of the beta1-receptor stimulator prenalterol and the beta2-receptor stimulator terbutaline infused in increasing doses after a placebo. Terbutaline caused a dose-dependent decrease in diastolic blood-pressure (BP) and an increase in systolic BP and heart-rate (HR), while mean arterial pressure (MAP) did not change. Prenalterol produced a dose-dependent increase in MAP and systolic BP, while diastolic BP was unaffected. HR was increased only by the largest dose of prenalterol. The haemodynamic effects of the terbutaline infusion can be explained by a reflex response to the vasodilatation induced by stimulation of the vascular beta2-receptors, while the effects of prenalterol can mainly be accounted for by a direct action on beta1-receptors in the heart. These observations show that the cardiac side-effects of beta2-agonists cannot be avoided by producing more selective agonists. Terbutaline caused a dose-dependent increase in the ventilatory indices. Prenalterol in larger doses caused a limited but significant increase in the ventilatory indices, comparable to the decrease in ventilation caused by the beta1-selective blocker metoprolol. These findings suggest that the ventilatory effects of metoprolol and prenalterol are mediated via beta1-receptors in the airways, which apparently play a functional role in asthma.

Key words

terbutaline prenalterol asthma metoprolol haemodynamic effects ventilatory effects comparative trial bronchial β1-receptors selective β-blockers 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. P. M. Greefhorst
    • 1
  • C. L. A. van Herwaarden
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pulmonary DiseasesUniversity of Nijmegen, Medical Centre DekkerswaldH. LandstichtingThe Netherlands

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