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Journal of Comparative Physiology A

, Volume 159, Issue 2, pp 227–240 | Cite as

The innervation of the pyloric region of the crab,Cancer borealis: Homologous muscles in decapod species are differently innervated

  • Scott L. Hooper
  • Michael B. O'Neil
  • Robert Wagner
  • John Ewer
  • Jorge Golowasch
  • Eve Marder
Article

Summary

The muscles of the pyloric region of the stomach of the crab,Cancer borealis, are innervated by motorneurons found in the stomatogastric ganglion (STG). Electrophysiological recording and stimulating techniques were used to study the detailed pattern of innervation of the pyloric region muscles. Although there are two Pyloric Dilator (PD) motorneurons in lobsters, previous work reported four PD motorneurons in the crab STG (Dando et al. 1974; Hermann 1979a, b). We now find that only two of the crab PD neurons innervate muscles homologous to those innervated by the PD neurons in the lobster,Panulirus interrruptus. The remaining two PD neurons innervate muscles that are innervated by pyloric (PY) neurons inP. interruptus. The innervation patterns of the Lateral Pyloric (LP), Ventricular Dilator (VD), Inferior Cardiac (IC), and PY neurons were also determined and compared with those previously reported in lobsters. Responses of the muscles of the pyloric region to the neurotransmitters, acetylcholine (ACh) and glutamate, were determined by application of exogenous cholinergic agonists and glutamate. The effect of the cholinergic antagonist, curare, on the amplitude of the excitatory junctional potentials (EJPs) evoked by stimulation of the pyloric motor nerves was measured. These experiments suggest that the differences in innervation pattern of the pyloric muscles seen in crab and lobsters are also associated with a change in the neurotransmitter active on these muscles. Possible implications of these findings for phylogenetic relations of decapod crustaceans and for the evolution of neural circuits are discussed.

Keywords

Glutamate Region Muscle Decapod Crustacean Cholinergic Agonist Stimulate Technique 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Abbreviations

ACh

acetylcholine

Carb

carbamylcholine

cpv

muscles of the cardio-pyloric valve

cpv7n

nerve innervating muscle cpv7

cv

muscles of the ventral cardiac ossicles

cv1n

nerve innervating muscle cvl

cv2n

nerve innervating muscle cv2

EJP

excitatory junctional potential

IC

inferior cardiac neuron

IV

inferior ventricular neuron

IVN

inferior ventricular nerve

LP

lateral pyloric neuron

LPG

lateral posterior gastric neuron

lvn

lateral ventricular nerve

mvn

medial ventricular nerve

p

muscles of the pylorus

PD

pyloric dilator neuron

PDin

intrinsic PD neuron

PDex

extrinsic PD neuron

pdn

pyloric dilator nerve

PY

pyloric neuron

pyn

pyloric nerve

STG

stomatogastric ganglion

VD

ventricular dilator neuron

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Scott L. Hooper
    • 1
  • Michael B. O'Neil
    • 1
  • Robert Wagner
    • 1
  • John Ewer
    • 1
  • Jorge Golowasch
    • 1
  • Eve Marder
    • 1
  1. 1.Biology DepartmentBrandeis UniversityWalthamUSA

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